Inactive posts

Posts that are old or withdrawn, as out-of-date, superseded or just not worth staying in view but kept for historical reasons.

RM syllabus update

This blog reports on developments in the training of doctors in Rehabilitation Medicine (RM) in the UK. In summary, most of the major documents about training are now complete, and most are agreed. Rehabilitation Medicine Curriculum.This is the foundation. This has been agreed by the General Medical Council, and now will start being the curriculum …

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BSRM website survey

I am currently leading a working party looking at the website of the British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine (BSRM). Members of the BSRM who read their electronic, emailed newsletter should be aware of this. Only one person responded to the President’s request for volunteers. I do not know if this reflects satisfaction with the site, …

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RM syllabus consultation

The syllabus for the Rehabilitation Medicine curriculum is being developed by a working party under the aegis of the Specialist Advisory Committee, which is responsible for the training programmes. A first draft has been completed, and we are putting it out for review by anyone interested. This post gives a little background information, explains the …

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Virtual reality

Virtual reality is a term used very loosely in rehabilitation research. It often, probably usually refers to computer games with block designs not unlike Minecraft, Wii games, Kinect and X-Box, and similar programmes with more, or often much less realistic images on a flat computer screen. The product used is rarely virtual, nor is is …

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Measuring activity over time

Whatever the cause, many people with a long-term disability move less than other people of a similar age. Short-term measurement with accelerometers can measure this, but it is a snap-shot and daily fluctuations will lead to difficulties in interpretation. In a study on 56 (reducing to 48 over 30 months) people with multiple sclerosis, activity …

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Post Covid (syndrome)

Ten days ago I spent time commenting on the forthcoming Post-Covid syndrome clinical guideline being developed (rapidly) by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). It was full of references. Today (15th December 2020) I received notification of a useful Canadian Rapid Evidence Review from Alberta Healthcare. It will obviously go out of …

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Physician-assisted death

This is a controversial topic that is of direct relevance to rehabilitation. Many of our patients have lives that, to an outside observer at least, seem impoverished and lacking meaning and quality. Luckily often we are incorrect (or insufficiently imaginative), and patients do consider they have both a purpose, and a good quality of life. …

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Profession specific research

A recently published paper gave “Occupational therapy consensus recommendations for functional neurological disorder”. So what is this? Do occupation therapists have so much more experience, knowledge etc that recommendation by them have greater credibility? Not really, and the authors included many people who were not occupational therapists (and who were experts). Do occupational therapists have …

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Economic trial outcomes

It might be assumed that, if a trial showed no clinical benefit, then an economic evaluation would not be warranted. Not always true. There is no reason why an trial intervention might not be superior, but might be achieved at less cost. Of course, some studies set out explicitly to test that hypothesis. But in …

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